12:00 AM, November 06, 2016 / LAST MODIFIED: 12:00 AM, November 06, 2016

Mental Health

Depression: let’s talk

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Depression is an illness that can happen to anybody. It causes mental anguish and affects people’s ability to carry out everyday tasks, with sometimes devastating consequences for relationships with family and friends.

At worst, depression can lead to suicide. Fortunately, depression can be prevented and treated. The World Health Organisation (WHO) launched a one-year campaign: Depression: let’s talk on the eve of this years World Mental Health Day.

Depression is an illness characterised by persistent sadness and a loss of interest in activities that you normally enjoy, accompanied by an inability to carry out daily activities, for at least two weeks. In addition, people with depression normally have several of the following symptoms: a loss of energy; a change in appetite; sleeping more or less; anxiety; reduced concentration; indecisiveness; restlessness; feelings of worthlessness, guilt, or hopelessness; and thoughts of self-harm or suicide.

At its worst, depression can be a frightening, debilitating condition. Millions of people around the world live with depression. Many of these individuals and their families are afraid to talk about their struggles, and don't know where to turn for help. However, depression is largely preventable and treatable. Recognising depression and seeking help is the first and most critical towards recovery.

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